Collecting Easter Memories

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When I was growing up Easter was a special day of the spring season. I always knew what was important about Easter, which was the resurrection of Jesus Christ.  While church came first, our family would then made a trip to Ocean City, Maryland to walk on the boardwalk with our new Easter outfits. Back in the 1950s, we called it the “Easter Parade” and my dad would sing about our Easter bonnets.  I wore my little white gloves, pink pocketbook and pink hat with flowers.

But as a child, I also knew that the Easter was important as the Easter bunny would be putting candy in my Easter basket.  Back then, I kept that special basket and put it out each year for the bunny.  In fact, it is now over 60 years old and I still have it. Nowadays, the baskets just get thrown away.  As I have shopped antique shops, I have accumulated a lot of old Easter baskets, in all shapes and sizes. I am sure that the size of the basket depended on what the parents could afford to fill.

From postcards to fuzzy chicks there is a lot of collectibles to bring back childhood memories.  From left to right: 1950s Vintage Easter Egg Candy Container Paper Mache; Vintage Easter Decoration Chick On Nest Honeycomb Body; Rosbro Easter Bunny On Wheels Candy Rabbit Container; 1950s Easter Bunny Plastic Bank Knickerbocker; 1940s 1950s Germany Easter Candy Container Pink Duck; Knickerbocker Vintage Easter Bunny Plastic Bank and 1950’s Woven Reed Easter Basket Bamboo Trim Japan.

I often put a few of the baskets around the house and put the milk glass Easter eggs in them. These are just a few of the great Easter pieces you can find online at http://www.icollect247.com.  Come visit our site for all vintage pieces offered by quality sellers. .

 

 

Sailor’s Valentine

Have you heard the term Sailor’s Valentines and wondered who and what this was? Interesting enough, this is a term that modern-day collectors assigned to what they thought sailors created during their free time. After doing some investigating, it was discovered that the sailors really did not make them, but purchased them for loved ones stateside.

sailor framed

This beautiful and interesting form of folk art came into being during the late 19th and early 20th century.  Hundreds of tiny seashells were glued onto a cotton backing.  Each type of shell was then separated by a partition.   Designs were colorful and creative.  Many had a message, such as “Thinking of You”, “Forget Me Not” and “Home Again” written on the shells.

star shell

Through research and examination, they found that most of the shells came from the same West Indies Island, with similar designs and workmanship.  They also concluded the island of Barbados was often the last port for many whalers, English, and Dutch traders.  Barbados is located to the east of the West Indies Islands in the Atlantic Ocean. So perhaps those sailors did buy these for souvenirs to take home.  They also found that these early turn of the century examples stopped during the time when whaling stopped and steamships came into fashion.

think of me

In the late 1930’s, these folk art shells were rediscovered in attics and collectors begin to see them as beautiful works of art.  From very simple designs to large ornate pieces we still enjoy them from the past as a piece of the “sea”. When you picture a rough and strong sailor, the last thing you think they would purchase is something so delicate, but the men longed for their homes and loved ones and this was a way to show their women how much they missed them.

sailors3

Does collecting sound fun?  Check out over 20,000 vintage pieces from postcards to furniture on http://www.icollect247.com.  If you enjoyed this post, check out our Antique Back Roads magazine, full of articles written by collectors – http://www.AntiqueBackRoads.com.  We enjoy your comments and like us on facebook.