Are You Watching?

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I started going to local auctions about 5 years ago when I retired. I bought just about anything that I thought I could make a profit on. WRONG. Ended up losing money on most. Then I either read or heard someone say that you should focus on and become a expert on 1 or 2 items. Since I always had a fascination for vintage pocket watches I choose this item. Now I go to every local auction I can searching for gems. Many times I find them. I keep the ones that I really like and usually list the others now I COLLECT 247. I have many – yes very many men’s wrist watches and pocket watches. I try to list a few every day. So keep watching.

These are currently for sale in my webstore on http://www.icollect247 is https://www.icollect247.com/happymiller.

Thanks to our guest blogger – Kenneth Miller.

Prison Purses and Wallets

Prison Art Woven Cigarette Pack is Folk Art is a collectible from the 1920’s thru the 1950’s.  If you think it is a funny term or never heard of it, you will find this article interesting.

Back in the 1920’s and 1950’s weaving items was a way for idle inmates to pass time, hence the prison art term was born. Leftover cellophane wrappers became the material that was used when the cigarettes had been smoked.  These were woven from any brand that the inmates had available.  They were arranged in colorful panels and woven in an array of patterns.

Wallets and purses were made to give to their family and friends.  Wallets were quick and easy and the inmate did not have to have a lot of the packs. These had slots for cash and 2 pockets for I.D.. and photographs. Large purses and pocketbooks were also made.  Cigarette packs that were used included Pall Malls, Camels, Kools and Lucky Strikes.

Above are pictures of recently sold pieces on icollect247.com.  A hand-printed note inside of the wallets stated that they had been made in the 1920s by an inmate at the old Virginia State Penitentiary on Spring St. in Richmond.  Mint pieces, like the above, are hard to find.  Kind of reminds me of “Tramp Art”.